Natural Shampoo

Converting to a natural shampoo that does not recommend the use of a conditioner around the time of dying my hair made me very nervous. Very nervous indeed.

But I really needn’t of been.

Odylique’s Gentle Herb Shampoo is great!

unnamed (39)

It is 100% natural and 70% organic. It is free from animal testing, sulfates, fragrance, artificial preservatives and salt and it comes in a 100% recycled UK-made bottle.

To get the best out of the shampoo I put a couple of pumps in my hands and lather onto my hair and scalp, leave to soak for about 2-3 minutes, then rinse. Leaving the shampoo in gives the hair a chance to absorb the active ingredients. This is what takes away the need for a conditioner and still works on sensitive scalps and dyed hair.

Please be aware that because this shampoo is sulfate free, it does not lather as much as a ‘normal’ shampoo, this does not mean you haven’t used enough.

unnamed (38).jpg

INGREDIENTS: ALOE VERA JUICE, COCONUT AND CORN GLUCOSE, COCONUT OIL, CHAMOMILE, NETTLE, HORSETAIL, ROSEMARY, SUNFLOWER, SUGAR CANE, PLANT STABILISERS

My hair is in great condition at the moment, I find a wash now lasts two days instead of one and I’m saving money/creating less waste on not using a conditioner.

Cheers Odylique!

Saturday Shop

I don’t often go shopping. It’s always busy, people are annoying and on most high-streets I HATE what’s on offer. Yesterday however I braved the grim weather  and annoyances and spent the day shopping in Nottingham.

Before going I did some research on vintage and independent stores to go visit. Nottingham, it turns out, has plenty!

Vintage

I love vintage, not only is it the most sustainable kind of purchase (apart from not buying at all) but the quality and design of retro clothes are just so much better.

unnamed-2

On my visit to Nottingham I went into Cow, Wild, Braderie and Hopkinson‘s and managed to treat myself to a new dress and cardigan.

unnamed-1

Not going to lie, vintage shopping takes more effort than browsing an organised rail in Marks and Sparks. But it is fun having a trawl through rails and piles of retro clobber. Laughing at some of the styles, being slightly frustrated that an amazing item is 10 times too small or big and falling in love with something that has a little rip or stain is all part and parcel of the experience.
unnamed-3

Vintage items are not just “used clothes”, they’re a piece of history, both in the historical sense and on a personal level. Think about the people who wore them, what’s their story?

Other advantages – Tonnes and tonnes of clothing ends up at landfill every week. Buying vintage lessens this waste. The cost of creating a brand new piece of clothing is not only expensive monetarily but environmentally, through the use of natural resources and the creation of pollution. Buying something that already exists reduces that cost.

Give it a go, shop vintage!

Independent

Hidden up a side street a pretty window display caught my eye. I decided to pop in and have a browse. Stick and Ribbon is one of the friendliest shops I’ve ever been in. Filled with one off, independent pieces I was welcomed and shown what was on offer.

A few weeks back when I was doing research for ethical lingerie I came across Kinky Knickers, and to my delight Stick and Ribbon stocked their items. Kinky Knickers is a British handmade lingerie brand that partners with Mary Portas. Sewn in Manchester with love and care, their pants are designed to be comfy, have no VPL and to look pretty.

unnamed-12

I couldn’t resist. Bought myself a pair. Not just a great quality pair of pants, but they provided a giggle. Hidden in their washing guidelines was a handy tip:

“Wash similar colours together. Use colour safe detergent (or give it to your mother – she’ll know what to do.”

It is these personal touches that make buying independent so very worth it. But don’t worry Mam, I’ll wash them myself!