Sunday Share

This weekend I haven’t moved very far from the couch, had a very VERY lazy one. So for my blog post this week I thought I’d continue with the laziness and just share with you (from my couch) my thoughts on five things that are on my radar.

  1. Ecosia – My new search engine. A couple of weeks ago I switched from Google to Ecosia. Basically, every time you search, the search ads that pop up generates an income, with that income Ecosia plant trees. In just a couple of weeks my searches have planted 76 trees… and I didn’t even have to get off the couch!Screen Shot 2018-02-11 at 11.45.47
  2. Jamestown – Started Saturday lunchtime, already 7 episodes deep. In a nutshell, English settlers in America around 1600 (little bit Pocahontaseqsue), for years there were just men in the colony, then along come women. The series is about the issues facing these women. Rape, witch accusations and general frustrating and cruel sexism. The main characters are brilliant, strong willed and intelligent. Definitely worth a watch. #girlpower
  3. Valentine’s day – Just around the corner. Please please please don’t buy your other half something they will never use, that will end up in the bin, that they don’t really want. Why not do something together? Or get them something they really need? Or, like me, just ignore the day and focus on the pancakes you will be eating instead?
  4. Plastic – Such a hot topic at the moment. Every where I look; the news, facebook, TV, there are photos and stories around plastic pollution. Big companies are finally starting to put strategies in place to reduce their packaging which is great and well overdue, but photos like this still haunt me. Be conscious of what you’re buying. Is that carrier really necessary?seaturtle
  5. Derry Girls – Absolutely hilarious Channel 4 comedy series set in the 90’s about a group of teenage girls in Northern Ireland. I won’t say any more. Just watch it!

Right, blog post done, time to get back to Jamestown and chilling on the couch.

Have a good one x

FFS – The Shaviour

Shaving for me is like trying to get the last bit of ketchup out of a bottle, it’s like temperature control in an office (too hot, too cold, never right), it’s like finding somewhere you really want to eat but realising they don’t accept card and the closest cash machine is a 10 minute walk away… basically shaving for me is an annoyance.

But I have now found a ‘Shaviour’. Something that makes shaving a little less annoying.

Friction Free Shaving (FFS) is the first razor delivery service designed exclusively for women. Basically you sign up and they send you a cool metal handle (less plastic!!) and fresh blades every month.


If like me you keep your razor forever and ever, rarely remembering to change it, you’re probably wondering why you get fresh blades every month. What I hadn’t even considered was how unhygienic it was using the same blade over and over again, bacteria and all sorts of minging bits builds up in them. The concept of FFS is that they send out four blades a month, one for every week. That way you’re shaving your legs with bacteria and gunk free blades, resulting in a friction free shave. Voila!


I went for the Rose razor package. The handle comes free (or £5 if you want it engraved like mine) and for £9 a month I get four blades delivered. The blades are great value for money, for example if you compare quality like for like, a four-pack of Gillette blades costs £12.99. If you don’t need any more blades you can stop your subscription at any time, or swap your blade delivery for some of their shave scrubs, creams or balms.

If this sounds up your street and you fancy giving FFS a go, use this code to get 25% off your first order 5XGF71.

Happy shaving! xxx


Beeswax Food Wraps

My war on plastic has amazingly rubbed off onto my Mam. Just yesterday she was showing me her new jazzy KeepCup (reusable coffee cup). Another of her recent sustainable swaps has been ditching cling film for Cling Cloths.


Aside from my Dad accidentally popping one in the bin as he didn’t realise they were reusable, she’s been very happy with the cloths. Using them on cheese, bread, fruit, packed lunches… basically anything you tend to reach for cling film or a plastic bag to keep fresh.

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Cling Cloths are handmade in the UK from locally sourced, sustainable ingredients and allows food to breathe naturally keeping it fresher for longer. They are reusable (DAD!), non-toxic, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, water resistant, biodegradable and NOT PLASTIC!

Initially the cost may put you off, but when you weigh up how many rolls of cling film you buy in a year against a pack of reusable beeswax wraps, it actually works out cheaper.

In March I’m moving in with my parents, so will no doubt have many more tales to tell on how they’re becoming more ethical and sustainable in what they buy and do.

Keep up the good work Mam and Dad! xxx

Guppyfriend – Microfibres Solution

Plastic is a problem and a lot of the time we think of bottles, bags, packaging. But synthetic clothes (think sports gear, polyester shirts, nylon tights) also cause environmental problems. Every time you wash a piece of synthetic clothing plastic microfibres get into the water stream heading into our rivers and oceans.

The Story of Stuff have developed a brilliant short film on microfibres, definitely check it out! In overview the problem is that there are 1.4million,trillion microfibres in our oceans and rivers which are toxic and are eaten by fish causing them to become sick, which ultimately works it’s way up the food chain to us.

Tonight Blue Planet II is on again, such a great programme. Sadly those amazing creatures are just bobbing around and unconsciously consuming toxic particles caused by us. So what can we do to prevent putting microfibres into our water?

  • Buy clothes made of natural materials
  • Use liquid and less washing detergent
  • Wash less often
  • Use a Guppyfriend!


Until we completely change our consumption behaviours, the Guppyfriend is a good way to reduce plastic pollution from our clothes. It’s basically a bag you pop synthetic clothes into before putting it into your washing machine, collecting the microfibres. Simple but effective.

Head to STOP! MICRO WASTE, a non-profit organisation in Berlin, to get your very own.

Meaty Impact and Innovations

Lately it seems everyone is talking about meat and the sustainability issues that surround it. So I’m going to join in!

Of course, this isn’t the first time I’ve wrote about it, earlier this year I tried Veganuary, then for Lent I gave up meat and now I’d class myself as Flexitarian (or whatever new trendy name it’s been given this week). Basically I go days, weeks even without eating meat.

A few nights ago Channel 4’s Food Unwrapped broadcast a special on the innovations that are making meat healthier for us and better for the planet. It’s definitely worth a watch, but if you haven’t got the time, here are some highlights…



Did you know?

Cows produce more methane than cars, planes and trains combined. They release about 120kg of methane per year. Methane is a greenhouse gas like carbon dioxide (CO2). But the negative effect on the climate of methane is 23 times higher than the effect of CO2. 

33% of cereals grown in the UK are used for meat production.

Most of the world’s soy crop ends up in feed for poultry, pork and cows. The expansion of soy to feed the world’s growing demand for meat contributes to deforestation. 

For 2kg of chicken it takes 4.6kg of feed. For 2kg of pork it takes 6kg of feed. And for 2kg of beef it takes 30kg of feed. That is a lot of crop needed for a small amount of meat!

It takes 15,000 litres of water to produce 1kg of beef but only 1,250 litres for 1kg of wheat.

The innovations for a more ‘sustainable’ meat industry covered were a little bonkers, but it does show that the industry is starting to look at alternative ways in order to protect the planet.

Belgian Super Cows – Apparently these huge muscly cows are bred through natural selection (hmmm) due to an inactive muscle control gene. They produce around 30% more meat than a normal cow and somehow do this through eating the same amount of food as a normal cow.


Spirulina Algae – Spirulina is an edible microalgae that can be grown in tanks on top of buildings. It’s still new technology but it could be used to replace normal animal feeds freeing up land currently used to grow animal feed to grow human vegetation instead.


Ostrich Meat – Ostrich’s produce 10 times less methane than cows, they require 3 times less land to graze, can produce 64 tons of meat in a lifetime opposed to a cows 1.72 tons and the water footprint of ostriches is roughly a third of cows.


If you’re having a BBQ this bank holiday, why not give an ostrich burger a go? Or veggie sausages? My favourite is BBQ’d pineapple. Yum! Whatever you do, have a great long weekend! xxx

Sustainable Sports Stadium

The amazing London 2012 Olympics took place at the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park. The Park was developed with a very sustainable vision. Unfortunately I wasn’t able to make it to the Olympics back in 2012, however on Saturday I was lucky enough to be at the World Athletics Championships held at the Park and managed to see first hand how the sustainability legacy of the games was holding up.

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The first thing I noticed when walking to the Park from Hackney Wick station was the area’s development. There were loads of brand new residential areas which I am told are low energy, low water and made from non-toxic materials. They were surrounded by cycle lanes, a pretty canal and plenty greenery supporting both sustainable transport and biodiversity.




Arriving at the Park I was astonished by the organisation. Every block of seats had toilets and a food stall. No queues in sight! Most corners hosted bins which were clearly labelled for either general or recycled waste. There were plenty of points to refill water bottles encouraging the reduction in single use plastic bottles and when I treated myself to a tasty hot dog I was pleased to see that the packaging was fully recyclable.

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Once the morning athletics session was over I ventured over to the ‘Hero Village’ which was full of fun activities. One activity really caught my eye. The ‘Blue Badge Park Tour’ gave children wheelchairs and tasked them to navigate ramps, doorways and corners to become more aware of what it is like for those with disabilities.

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From what I can see the sustainable vision for the Park is still going strong.

Did you know?

  • By 2025 there will be 15,000 jobs created
  • More than 5,000 people (30 per cent from the local area) worked on the Park during its transformation – including 60 apprentices
  • Planning permission has been granted for 6,800 homes
  • There are 525 bird boxes and 150 bat boxes
  • Over 4,000 trees, 74,000 plants, 60,000 bulbs and 240,000 wetland plants have/will be planted
  • The venues use 56% less drinking water than equivalent buildings

After the athletics I headed to the ArcelorMittal Orbit for a look around and a journey down their world’s highest and longest tunnel slide (178 metres!). Designed by sculptor Sir Anish Kapoor and engineer Cecil Balmond, the ArcelorMittal Orbit is just outside the Park. It’s made of 60% recycled steel, including washing machines and used cars. At the top of the building you get a 20 mile view of the Olympic Park and the London skyline. Once at the top you can either walk down the outer staircase, abseil down or do what I did and slide down. It was so fun!!!


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Whilst the likelihood is very slim that an Olympic Games or World Championship will ever be at the Park again in my lifetime it is still worth a visit as there is so much to do in the area. You can take a stadium tour, go for a walk or bike ride, check out the Energy Centre, take a boat ride, have some delicious food or drinks by the canal, see some art… the list goes on and on!

The Best Things in Life Aren’t Things

Writing an ethical blog is sometimes difficult. There is a massive conflict of interests; aiming to consume less but then needing things to review and write about. So here is a list of my top 5 favourite ‘non-things’…

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  1. Travelling, experiencing different places, having new adventures.
    • Already this year I’ve been lucky to visit Warsaw, Cervinia and Berlin and at the end of September I’m off to Dubrovnik (any tips on where to go, what to do are welcome!). My travelling bucket list is constantly growing, every time I tick a place off, another destination is added. There’s a big world out there to explore, experience new cultures, do fun things. Next year I’ve got a lot of travelling lined up, and I just cannot wait!
  2. Seeing friends and family.
    • Living away from friends and family does have it’s perks. When I do see them I appreciate it much more than if I saw them every other week. Last weekend I visited my friend Grace in London, it was great to catch up over a lot of beers, Turkish food and a play. This weekend my Grandparents are visiting and we’ll be having a BBQ (British weather depending). I love having visits lined up in my diary, not great for the bank account, but great to see those you love.
  3. Reading a book, watching shows, films or a series and listening to music.
  4. Preparing and eating food.
    • If it didn’t have such negative consequences, I would probably spend all of my time eating. My days tend to revolve around what I’m having for my breakfast, dinner and tea (a.k.a lunch and dinner for you Southerners). At the moment my go to meal for breakfast, dinner or tea is avocado and eggs on toast. Just cannot beat it!
  5. Exercising.
    • It’s not only good for you, but it can be fun and pushing yourself is very satisfying. My favourite ways to exercise are going for walks, doing a pilates or spin class or going for a run. The best ways to keep motivated are by doing it with a friend, listening to a podcast or signing yourself up for a race or challenge.

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With resources depleting and waste piles increasing it is more important than ever to consume less. Spending your money on ‘non-things’ is much better than buying something you don’t really need.

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