Beeswax Food Wraps

My war on plastic has amazingly rubbed off onto my Mam. Just yesterday she was showing me her new jazzy KeepCup (reusable coffee cup). Another of her recent sustainable swaps has been ditching cling film for Cling Cloths.


Aside from my Dad accidentally popping one in the bin as he didn’t realise they were reusable, she’s been very happy with the cloths. Using them on cheese, bread, fruit, packed lunches… basically anything you tend to reach for cling film or a plastic bag to keep fresh.

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Cling Cloths are handmade in the UK from locally sourced, sustainable ingredients and allows food to breathe naturally keeping it fresher for longer. They are reusable (DAD!), non-toxic, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, water resistant, biodegradable and NOT PLASTIC!

Initially the cost may put you off, but when you weigh up how many rolls of cling film you buy in a year against a pack of reusable beeswax wraps, it actually works out cheaper.

In March I’m moving in with my parents, so will no doubt have many more tales to tell on how they’re becoming more ethical and sustainable in what they buy and do.

Keep up the good work Mam and Dad! xxx

Ho Ho Ho Hospitality


How many of you will be going out at least once over Christmas for food or drinks?

I’d put money on most of you.

While you are out laughing, joking, enjoying yourselves with friends and family… think about the people serving, preparing and cleaning up after your food and drinks. At this time of the year those people don’t get time off work, time with their loved ones, time to cabbage out in front of the tele after eating their body weight in sprouts.

Until 3 and a half years ago my boyfriend was a chef. It’s not just those that are working over Christmas that miss out, it’s also their husbands, girlfriends, children and parents. I found that out first hand.

But it’s not just at Christmas that we should turn our attention to those that work in hospitality. It is an industry with a very high turnover in staff. The contracts offered to employees verge on illegal. For instance, take the next 7 days, a Chef de Partie in a hotel could work the following shifts on a £17k annual salary.

  • Wednesday – 6am-3pm
  • Thursday – 10am – 10pm
  • Friday – 10am – 11pm
  • Saturday – off
  • Christmas Eve – 5am-3pm
  • Christmas Day – 8am – 8pm
  • Boxing Day – off
  • Wednesday – 10am-10pm

That’s 62 hours (taking into account a lunch break which most do not actually get). That works out at £5.30 an hour. Considering the national minimum wage for over 25’s in the UK is £7.50 and the maximum weekly working hours are 48… it’s pretty shoddy isn’t it?

I often write about slave labour, workers being exploited and unsafe working conditions. Many of the issues I write about are concerning overseas, mainly developing countries. But this is happening right here in the UK, on our doorsteps, and it is deemed ‘acceptable’.

We even watch programmes about it! We see Masterchef and Gordon Ramsay. We see kitchens operating under pressure, the use of violence and abusive language. Yet there seems to be no urgency to change the industry.

Don’t get me wrong, not all kitchens are like this. Some employers pay their staff well, give them decent hours and treat them right. But for the majority, long unsociable hours, low pay and uncomfortable working conditions are the norm.

So this Christmas (and the rest of the year) when you go out to eat or drink, treat those that serve you with the respect that they deserve.

Meaty Impact and Innovations

Lately it seems everyone is talking about meat and the sustainability issues that surround it. So I’m going to join in!

Of course, this isn’t the first time I’ve wrote about it, earlier this year I tried Veganuary, then for Lent I gave up meat and now I’d class myself as Flexitarian (or whatever new trendy name it’s been given this week). Basically I go days, weeks even without eating meat.

A few nights ago Channel 4’s Food Unwrapped broadcast a special on the innovations that are making meat healthier for us and better for the planet. It’s definitely worth a watch, but if you haven’t got the time, here are some highlights…



Did you know?

Cows produce more methane than cars, planes and trains combined. They release about 120kg of methane per year. Methane is a greenhouse gas like carbon dioxide (CO2). But the negative effect on the climate of methane is 23 times higher than the effect of CO2. 

33% of cereals grown in the UK are used for meat production.

Most of the world’s soy crop ends up in feed for poultry, pork and cows. The expansion of soy to feed the world’s growing demand for meat contributes to deforestation. 

For 2kg of chicken it takes 4.6kg of feed. For 2kg of pork it takes 6kg of feed. And for 2kg of beef it takes 30kg of feed. That is a lot of crop needed for a small amount of meat!

It takes 15,000 litres of water to produce 1kg of beef but only 1,250 litres for 1kg of wheat.

The innovations for a more ‘sustainable’ meat industry covered were a little bonkers, but it does show that the industry is starting to look at alternative ways in order to protect the planet.

Belgian Super Cows – Apparently these huge muscly cows are bred through natural selection (hmmm) due to an inactive muscle control gene. They produce around 30% more meat than a normal cow and somehow do this through eating the same amount of food as a normal cow.


Spirulina Algae – Spirulina is an edible microalgae that can be grown in tanks on top of buildings. It’s still new technology but it could be used to replace normal animal feeds freeing up land currently used to grow animal feed to grow human vegetation instead.


Ostrich Meat – Ostrich’s produce 10 times less methane than cows, they require 3 times less land to graze, can produce 64 tons of meat in a lifetime opposed to a cows 1.72 tons and the water footprint of ostriches is roughly a third of cows.


If you’re having a BBQ this bank holiday, why not give an ostrich burger a go? Or veggie sausages? My favourite is BBQ’d pineapple. Yum! Whatever you do, have a great long weekend! xxx

My Plastic Free Struggle

Somehow we’re now mid way through the month, and as promised in my previous post here is an update on how my Plastic Free July is going…

Truthfully, it’s not going very well.

I’ve had some successes…


I’ve been shopping from my local greengrocers and taking reusable bags with me, this massively cuts down on plastic packaging and carrier bags.


I take my stainless steel One Green Bottle everywhere with me.

I received a Lush delivery with plastic free packaging. Eco-flo chips were used to protect the product, simply run the chips under water and they biodegrade.


I now buy baked beans in single cans, not multi packs of four which are coated in plastic.

But also some failures…

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I ran the Great North 10k the other week and it was scorching, so I ended up grabbing a plastic bottle from one of the water stations on the way round, drinking it and then tossing it to the ground.


I’ve been on the road alot this month. Up to Durham, down to Bristol, up to Yorkshire, back to the Midlands… and unless you are very organised it is nearly impossible to not use plastic when stopping at a service station. Even with the best intentions of using my One Green Bottle I struggled to find somewhere to refill.

Dauntingly, round the corner may lie my biggest challenge yet…


This weekend I am off to a music festival. However I am very determined to try and use as little plastic as possible.


I will be taking my ‘pimp cup’ and asking the bar staff to serve me my pints in this instead of a disposable plastic cup. I’ve also got myself an Organic Humble toothbrush, which is made from bamboo, to take with me.

Did you know? More than 2 billion plastic toothbrushes end up in landfill sites every year.

How is your Plastic Free July going?

I’d love to hear about your struggles, and even better, your hints and tips!

Weekly Dose of Avocado

At least once a week I have avocado. Absolutely love the stuff. I have it in many shapes and forms. For breakfast, dinner or tea. Sometimes in a smoothie, with eggs on toast, in a wrap, with chili con carne or even just to dip some crisps.

Did you know…?

  • They’re are a fruit, and where most fruit is high in sugar, avocado is high in healthy fats (aka monounsaturated oleic acid)
  • They hold a wide variety of nutrients, including 20 different vitamins and minerals
  • They contain more potassium than a banana!

Tonight I’m having my weekly dose in the form of guacamole with poached eggs on toast.


Here is the guac recipe courtesy of Rob!


  • 1 ripe large avocado
  • 1/4 large red onion, finely diced
  • 2 beef tomatoes, de-seeded and diced
  • Bunch of coriander, roughly chopped
  • Juice of 1 lime
  • 1 red chili, finely diced
  • Pinch of salt


  • Mash the avocado up with a fork
  • Add the onion, tomatoes, coriander and chili then mix
  • Season with salt and lime juice, and voila! Done.


Easy, healthy and scrummy! If you want some more avo-inspo head to @bestofavocado on Instagram.

Plastic Free July

Plastic Free July aims to raise awareness of the problems with single-use disposable plastic and challenges people to do something about it. I have accepted this challenge!

The single-use disposables such as bottles, bags, tubs that we use just for a few minutes out of pure convenience are made from plastic, something that is designed to last forever…

These plastics:

  • break up, not break down – becoming a permanent pollution
  • are mostly sent to landfill
  • ‘escape’ from bins, trucks, hands to become litter
  • end up in water sources – scientists predict there will be more tonnes of plastic than tonnes of fish by 2050
  • transfer to the food chain – carrying pollutants with them
  • increase our footprint – plastic manufacturing consumes 6% of the world’s fossil fuels

Did you know? Every bit of plastic ever made still exists.


Throughout July I have challenged myself, and Rob (he has not escaped this) to do the following:


See here to start your own challenge.

I’ll be sharing on the blog and instagram what I do throughout July to avoid using plastic, it’d also be great to hear (if you accept the challenge) what you end up doing!



Super Simple Vegan Flapjack

On Sunday I’m hosting a Swap Shop to raise money for Labour Behind the Label (details of the event can be found here) and for the occasion I’m baking a whole load of sweet stuff. One of the easiest pieces, which I’ve just made, is a vegan flapjack.

Here is the recipe!



  • Preheat oven to 180°C/gas mark 4 and grease a 28cmx18cm baking tray, lining with baking paper
  • Put the spread, brown sugar and golden syrup into a pan on medium heat and mix until the spread and sugar dissolves
  • Remove the pan from the heat, add the porridge oats and sultanas and mix until they are fully coated
  • Press the mixture into the baking tray
  • Bake for 30 minutes until golden brown
  • Let the flapjack cool in the tray for 5 minutes then turn it out from the tray and let it cool on a cooling rack
  • Cut into squares, and voila! Done.

Cheap, easy and super simple to make. The flapjacks can also last for up to a week in a container. Perfect for my Swap Shop. And the crumbly bits off the side, I can enjoy now!