Upcycling Dungarees

Last summer on a very hot day I panic bought some dungaree shorts from a vintage shop. They’re cool, but very large, and because of that I’ve not had much wear out of them. This morning I decided to upcycle them into a dungaree dress.

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Upcycling clothes helps lessen the amount of waste going to landfill. It helps reduce CO2 emissions by using old materials instead of new ones. FACT – for every tonne of discarded textiles used again, 20 tonnes of CO2 is prevented from entering the atmosphere. It saves you money, as it allows you to find new uses for old clothes. Finally, it helps preserve our precious resources.

Refashioning these dungarees was dead simple.

Cut out the crotch area by cutting alongside both sides of the seam.

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Pin and then tack the old ‘legs’ to form a skirt by aligning the seams across the bottom. Cut out the excess material from the back.

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Sew along the seam.

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Voila!

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By no means am I a dab hand on a sewing machine. My Gran gave me this machine 4 years ago. It rarely gets used and apart from textiles lessons at school I’ve had no training. This is seriously something anybody can turn their hand to.

If you’re fed up with some of the clothes in your wardrobe, why not give them an upcycle spruce?

Super Sunday Swap Shop

People now buy four times more clothes than they did in the 80’s. To meet these increasing demands fashion brands are cutting corners in regards to worker rights, pay and safety. It also has huge consequences for the environment, on average UK consumers send 30kg of clothing to landfill each year.

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Labour Behind the Label are a charity that are dedicated to changing this. Throughout the year I’m doing a couple of challenges to raise money for them and today I held a Swap Shop to encourage the reuse of clothes and raise awareness of the issue.

A Swap Shop is simple, people bring any unwanted clothes, jewellery, books, toiletries etc. to swap. Anything that takes your fancy you can take and any left over bits will be donated to charity. One man/woman’s trash is another man/woman’s treasure.

With support from my amazing friends and family on the day we managed to raise a whopping £123!!!! It was great fun and we took away some cool pieces. My personal favourite is a demin jacket my mate Niamh brought. She had bought it from Dawn O’Porter who sold it on instagram for charity. And now it has been swapped, again for charity! A jacket that just keeps on giving.

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Thank you so much to everyone who has supported this so far. You’re all absolute legends. Especially my Mam, Alison, who today was a superstar! If you would like to donate click here.  Also, keep your ears to the ground as I’ll be hosting another Swap Shop soon!

Hope you’ve all had a great weekend, I know I certainly have. Good night x

 

30 Wears (✓)

“Take two very simple actions that we perform every single day: getting dressed and eating. Now start a journey backwards – to where your food and your clothes come from. At the other end, you will rarely find happy people, treated with dignity and respect.” – Livia Firth

In this post I’m focusing on the first action, getting dressed. Fast fashion is forcing people to buy more and waste more. The high demand of ‘needing’ the latest trends has forced retailers to use unethical ways to produce their clothes.

One way to contribute in making a positive change against this is by asking yourself when buying new clothes, “Can I wear this a minimum of 30 times?” If the answer is no… then don’t buy it. By using this rule not only are you helping the fast fashion crisis, but you are ensuring that the clothes you do buy are clothes you truly love.

Here I am sharing with you some of my favourite clothes that I’ve had for many years and have experienced many things. * I apologise that most pictures contain booze and for some of the hair cuts and pouts…

This item I bought in Oxfam Leeds for £4 in 2010 on a whim when visiting my sister at Uni for a night out. Since then it has seen many a bottle of beer and dance floor. 30 wears (✓).

This item is a Topshop coat I got as a birthday present from my parents in 2012. It now has holes in the armpit lining, but from the outside looks fine. 30 wears (✓).

This Fred P item I found in a vintage shop in 2011. It’s since been worn with scarves, shirts, dresses, skirts. 30 wears (✓).

This dress I nicked from my sister in 2014, I believe she wore it at least 30 times before I stole it. It’s been on loads of nights out and now I use it as a work dress. 30 wears (✓).

This item is a pair of dungarees I managed to get for £10 in a Zara sale in 2014. Whenever I feel stuck on what to wear, this is my go-to as it goes well with all sorts. 30 wears (✓).

If you have any fave clothes that you have worn a minimum of 30 times let me know or use the #30wears to create awareness.

Enjoy your clothes xxx

 

p.s I am raising money for Labour Behind the Label who work to fight fast fashion. If you can, donate here.

MUD Jeans & RePack

I am always on the look out for an ethical and environmentally friendly brand, so when I stumbled across MUD Jeans I got a little excited.

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MUD Jeans are produced in fair factories from recycled, organic or BCI cotton using around 80% less water and producing around 70% less CO2 compared to other denim producers.

MUD gives you the option to either purchase the jeans outright, or lease them. In leasing the jeans you pay a monthly fee for 12 months, then at the end of the 12 months you can either return to MUD or keep them. For me this is great as I tend to get bored of clothes quite quickly.

When my MUD package arrived, it landed through the letter box in a RePack bag. RePack is returnable and can be reused up to 20 times. When you return your RePack, which is free of charge, you receive a 10% discount email that can be used with any business that uses RePack.

Today I am off to return my RePack package, wearing my MUD Jeans and I cannot wait to use my 10% discount on another sustainable purchase.

Swedish Stockings

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Swedish Stockings was one of the first clothing brands I discovered when I began researching how to ‘consume consciously‘, and their tights are now a staple part of my weekend and work wardrobe.

Each year two billion pairs of tights are produced, worn and then chucked away. I myself was guilty of this. Being quite clumsy I was always laddering my tights and popping them straight in the bin, as lets be honest nobody wants to look like Effy off Skins anymore…

Luckily the Swedish brand have found an innovative solution to this problem.

Their quality tights are manufactured from recycled yarn, in zero waste factories that use environmentally friendly dye and solar power.

Also, not only do they provide a sustainable product, they put to good use your old tights, leaving space in your drawers for nice new ones. Once you have finished with your tights, of any brand, simply send them to their recycling centre. To top it off, when they receive your tights they send you over a discount code to use on your next Swedish purchase.

From what I can see they are not yet stocked anywhere in the UK, but if you do find them stocked locally please let me know. Swedish Stockings was a great first introduction for me into the world of ethical, clean, sustainable clothing. I hope this post has done the same for you.